Breadonbutter Guests, Guest Chefs, Recipes 0 comments on The Pasta Series: Jean’s Fresh and Exquisite Seafood Spaghetti

The Pasta Series: Jean’s Fresh and Exquisite Seafood Spaghetti

Guest Chef Jean Fares After quite some time, we are proud to welcome back our beloved Guest Chef Jean Fares! This time, he outdid himself with this delicious and all-fresh seafood pasta. He bought fresh calamari, fresh herbs, fresh vegetables and most importantly shrimps that were still alive (yes, that’s how fresh it was!) to make this absolutely phenomenal spaghetti dish that I keep on longing for ever since. Believe me, try to make it and you’ll definitely adopt it.

Jean’s birthday is tomorrow so I’ll be baking him a nice and yummy cake for the occasion (the one I had baked here).

Here’s what you’ll need:

Ingredients

– Fresh Shrimps. Keep the heads and shells aside to make the juice

– Fresh Calamari

– Coriander leaves

– 3 to 4 small tomatoes (choose them very red), chopped

– White wine

– Spaghetti

– Salt and Pepper

– 1 Onion (diced)

– 3 cloves of Garlic (diced)

How to make it:

1) Boil your spaghetti al dente and drain

2) Chop the onions, the garlic and chili pepper (If you want to spice it up)

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2) In a wok or pan, heat a bit of olive oil and cook the onions, garlic and pepper, then add the shrimp heads, white wine and chopped tomatoes. Let it simmer and reduce

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4) On a grill, cook the calamari

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5) Mix them all when they’re done, top it all with some fresh coriander leaves and experience an explosion of flavors 🙂

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Travel 1 comment on A Day in Rome

A Day in Rome

Rome is one of my favorite cities and for those of you who still haven’t been there, I seriously tell you to pack your bags this summer and head to Italy. You won’t regret it for a minute.

My sister Mia, the one who’s on the perfect cookie quest (read here for more details), lives in London. For her Easter holiday, she met my mom in Rome and they had the real dolce vita for a few days. I asked her to send me the highlights of her trip so that I could provide you with a taste of this great city. Here’s what one day in Rome could be like.

1. Start your day with a coffee and brioche at “Sant’Eustachio il caffe” (http://www.santeustachioilcaffe.it/) – best “caffe” in Rome. Have a quick breakfast at the bar.

2. Visit the church of San Luigi dei Francesi (http://saintlouis-rome.net/) which is just a few footsteps away from the cafe. It’s one of the few churches where you can see some of Caravaggio’s paintings for free and the church itself is beautiful.

San Luigi dei Francesi 2

3. Walk to Piazza Navona (a few minutes’ walk from the church). It’s one of the best “piazzas” in Rome. There, you can find the best gelato place. My advice would be Orange and Nutellone gelato flavors.

4. At lunchtime, head to Vicolo 88 on Via dell’Orso 88 for a nice lunch at one of my good friend Giovanni De Luca’s restaurants. (www.vicolo88.it)

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5. After lunch, head to Via del Corso for a bit of shopping and also visit the spanish steps and fontana di trevi close to there. Then, if you want, catch the andy Warhol Exhibition which is a fascinating summary of the artist’s life and his work. (http://www.wantedinrome.com/whats-on/2003489/andy-warhol-in-rome.html)

Spanish Steps

6. Later in the afternoon, go to Campo dei Fiori for a quick dash around the cutest market and then cross the bridge to Trastevere for a nice aperitivo (make sure you order a nice and fresh “Spritz”) followed by dinner in one of the charming trattorias around there.

Campo dei fiori

Aperitivo

This is just a preview of all the things you can do in Rome. There are so many other beautiful places there to see and restaurants to eat in. I’ll make sure to share everything if I go there this year.

Meanwhile, all you have to do is dream 😉

 

 

 

Breadonbutter Guests, Guest Chefs, Recipes 2 comments on Simit: The Middle Eastern Pretzel

Simit: The Middle Eastern Pretzel

The same way we have Arabic bread, French Baguette, English toast or any type of bread on our tables for breakfast, lunch or dinner, the Turks have Simit. It looks like a pretzel or kaak, tastes like a bagel or any of the above types combined, and it goes with everything. You can also give it any style you’d like. You can cut it in half and fill it with toppings of your choice or have it with any dish.

Until recently, I never thought it could be easily made at home. But luckily, our beloved guest chef Jean Fares succeeded!

So here’s what you’ll need:

– 1 pinch of Sugar

– 3 teaspoons of Dried Yeast

– 3.5 cups of All-Purpose Flour

– 1.5 teaspoons of Sea Salt

– 2/3 a cup pf Pekmez (also known as Grape Molasses)

– 1.5 cups of Sesame Seeds (not roasted)

How to make them:

1) In a small bowl, combine sugar and 1/4 cup of lukewarm water, then add the yeast on top. Let it rest for about 5 to 7 minutes or until it looks like foam (see picture below). Once it’s foamy, add 1.25 cups of lukewarm water on top

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2) In a bigger bowll, mix the flour and salt and top them with the yeast mixture above

3) Mix until you get a rough dough then knead it on a floured surface until it is smooth and elastic. Roll the dough into a ball and coat it with a bit of olive oil. Then, cover it well and place it in a warm place for about an hour or until it has doubled in size

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4) When the dough has doubled, take it out of the bowl and flatten in on a surface, then divide it into 6 even pieces (also rolled into balls)

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5) Work to make each ball into a large rope, then tie the two ends together and turn them on themselves like you would do with a real rope then join the 2 ends together to make a circle (pictures below)

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6) In another bowl, mix the pekmez with a 1/3 cup of water (normal temperature)

7) Dip each circle into the pekmez and water mixture, drain then roll them in a plate full of sesame seeds

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8) Place them all on a baking sheet and in the oven (preheated at 200 degrees celsius) for about 15 minutes or until golden and cooked (insert toothpick to check)

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Enjoy while they’re still hot and place the leftovers in the fridge! 🙂

 

 

 

Recipes 0 comments on Tzatziki

Tzatziki

I am always proud to tell people about my mixed nationalities. My mom is Greek and my dad is Lebanese. I am a mix of the two most “Mediterranean” cultures ever known (alongside the Italians). I’m using the word “Mediterranean” as an adjective, meaning chaotic, loud, in love with food, olive oil, the sun and the sea, always gathering for special occasions (varying from all family members’ birthdays -including the dog’s- to Christmas, Easter, and family members coming back from abroad) and laughing the night away.  
When I went to the UK in 2008 to study for my Masters degree, I met a lot of Greek people, “real” ones. Having always lived in Lebanon, the only information I had about Greek culture came from my grandparents and their stories. But I had always wanted to meet THE Greeks. I did, and I spent a lot of time in Greece visiting them. Of course, I seized the opportunity to learn the “real” tzatziki, how Greek mothers make it. Here it is.
What you’ll need:
– 5 to 6 Cucumbers
– Yogurt (i.e. ‘Laban’ for the Lebanese or Greek yogurt for all countries where you can find it)
– 5 Garlic cloves
– Olive oil
– Salt and Pepper
– A bowl
1) Peel the cucumbers’ skin, and throw it away. Then, continue peeling and add them all to the bowl

2) Crush the garlic cloves and add them on top of the cucumbers

3) Add salt and pepper

4) Add the yogurt on top of everything and mix

5) Add as much olive oil as you’d like and mix

And Voila! You can have it alone or with absolutely everything.

Parties & Happenings, Travel 1 comment on A Food Story

A Food Story

Summer in Lebanon cannot go by without at least one weekend in the Bekaa, the country’s most important farming and agricultural region. Wheat, corn, cotton, and vegetables are produced there and it also hosts a big number of vineyards and orchards mainly located around Zahle. 
On our way there last Saturday, we took the normal route, and stopped by our usual spots (to eat of course) before getting to Tawlet Ammiq, an eco-friendly Lebanese restaurant. 
Here’s what was on the menu:

Stop for ‘Labneh Makbousse’ at Hedwen (Chtaura)
You can also buy jam and olive oil (Hedwen)
The ‘Kaak bi Halib’ (Hedwen)

Araq at Tawlet Ammiq
Lots of local fruits
The famous “janereg” – the unexplained Lebanese fruit of the season – with a 961 beer before lunch
Boiled artichokes dipped in olive oil, lemon and garlic
“Batata Harra” i.e. fried potato cubes with coriander, chili powder and garlic
Halloumi cheese and strawberry jam
Rice, “Chich Barak” and “Mouloukhieh” – that I will be cooking and sharing soon
Grilled tomatoes, onions and broccoli skewers
Fresh lemonade
Fresh vine leaves to eat everything with
More fruits
Stuffed vine leaves in oil
Such a Saturday really makes you love your country.